SND Films
By Dee Hibbert-Jones
& Nomi Talisman
2015
Documentary
32' & 28' min.
USA
English
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2016 Academy Award ® nomination – Best Documentary Short Subject

When Bill Babbitt realizes his brother Manny has committed a crime he agonizes over his decision — should he call the police? Last Day of Freedom is a richly animated personal narrative that tells the story of Bill’s decision to stand by his brother, a Veteran returning from war, as he faces criminal charges, racism, and ultimately the death penalty. The film is a portrait of a man at the nexus of the most pressing social issues of our day- racial bias, veteran’s rights, mental health care and criminal justice.

Created from over 32,000 hand-drawn images, the film has garnered international film attention and won numerous awards since its premiere at Full Frame Film Festival in April 2015 where it won Best Short Documentary. Last Day of Freedom recently won the IDA Award for Best Short Documentary.

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SND Films
By J. Christian Jensen
2014
Documentary
20 min.
USA
English
Produced by J. Christian Jensen
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Set against the backdrop of a cruel North Dakota winter, White Earth is a tale of an oil boom that has drawn thousands to America’s Northern Plains in search of work. Told from the perspective of three children and an immigrant mother whose lives are touched by the oil boom, each story intertwines with the others – exploring themes of innocence, home, and the American Dream.

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SND Films
By Andreas Teichmann
2011
Documentary
5 min.
Germany
German
HD

A fun look at the annual championship of the german deer caller community, taking place at the hunting fair “Hunt and Dog” in Dortmund. During the competition eight gentlemen and firstly one lady battle against each other in three categories: “the young deer”, “two deers in a calling battle” and “old deer with two hinds”.

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SND Films
By Koert Davidse
2012
documentary
12 min.
Netherlands
Dutch
Produced by Serious Film
HD

Ferry Bertholet has a fascination for the Far East, and especially China. Over the past 30 years he has specialized in collecting Chinese erotic art, which is no longer to be found in China itself, where it has been banned and destroyed.
As a result, Bertholet now owns a big part of this cultural heritage. His collection is one of the largest in the world. It has also dominated his life: day and night, all he thinks about is his collection.

At odds with this is the realization – which has steadily grown over the years – that his collection is basically just things. This why he is now contemplating the idea of selling everything. He has already made contact with potential buyers in China. If all goes well, this cultural heritage will return to its country of origin.

Will he later regret having sold everything or will it be a relief?

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SND Films
By Koert Davidse
2014
documentary
29 min.
Netherlands
Various languages
Produced by Serious Film
HD

Little did Mark Janse know that what had started as a spinoff from his doctoral thesis would, more than a decade later, lead him to discover a Greek-related language that most of his fellow linguists had for decades written off as extinct.

In 2005, a couple of years after he first presented his research, Janse in 2005 received an astonishing email from a colleague at the University of Patra. Attached was a recent recording of a man saying: ‘Pateram doeka fesa epci’ (My father had 12 children). Immediately recognizing that these four words were Cappadocian, Janse found himself in tears. ’The next day, I booked a flight to Greece, and with my colleague I travelled to the village of Mandra. We really thought we were going to find the last speaker of Cappadocian.’

To their surprise they discovered that the whole village spoke Cappadocian.

In 2006 Janse spoke at an annual reunion, in Greek and a little in Cappadocian. ‘There were 5000 people there. Whenever I started saying something in Cappadocian, there was great applause. At the end, many old people were in tears, hugging and kissing me afterwards.’

He says that the sight of a foreign professor telling them that they ought to be proud of their language and culture moved them deeply, as for years Greek society had made them feel ashamed of their language because of its marked Turkish influence.

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SND Films
By Tanya Doyle
2014
Documentary
16 min.
Ireland
English
Produced by Marmalade Films
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In their sixties, seven women have decided to learn how to swim. Taking themselves out of their comfort zone, they reveal their determination to strive for survival, understanding and belonging. Combining visually arresting underwater imagery with informal interviews, the film immerses the audience in a world of exploration and wisdom.

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SND Films
By Alain Delannoy
2016
Animation
9 min.
Canada
English
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There are things in life you never forget.  One of them, like it or not, is “The Talk”.

In the film, adults share memories of the time when their parents first tried to explain sex to them. Using actual recordings of these recollections and a mix of hand drawn images, photographs, computer generated images as well as stop frame animated toys and props, the memories of several individuals have been caringly recreated in order to best present the awkwardness of one of life’s strangest occurrences.

– BEST ANIMATED SHORT: WARSAW FILM FESTIVAL, WARSAW, POLAND (2016)
– FIRST PRIZE – BEST ANIMATION: FLICKER’S RHODE ISLAND INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, RI, USA (2016)
– BEST ANIMATION/EXPERIMENTAL: WINDY AWARDS, WINNIPEG FILM GROUP, WINNIPEG, CANADA (2017)
– PRIX DEVARTI AWARD: ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL, ANN ARBOR, USA (2017)
– HONARABLE MENTION: ATLANTA FILM FESTIVAL, ATLANTA, USA (2017)
– AUDIENCE FAVORITE AWARDS: DAWSON CITY INTERNATIONAL SHORT FILM FESTIVAL, YUKON, CANADA (2017)

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SND Films
By Anna Bergmann
& André Hörmann
Website director
2018
Anidoc
15 min.
Germany
Japanese
Produced by Hörmann Filmproduktion
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Akiko Takakura is one of the last survivors of the atomic bomb explosion of Hiroshima. During Obon, she receives the spirits of her parents and is haunted by memories. Her father is an authoritarian and traditional man. Akiko’s childhood consists of constant rejections and beatings. But the horrors of the atomic bomb and Japan’s subsequent capitulation change everything. Finally Akiko experiences fatherly love in the midst of Hiroshima’s ruins.

Selected for:
Stuttgart Festival of Animated Film
Docaviv
Krakow Film Festival (Silver Dragon Award, for best animation)
Animafest Zagreb
Huesca International Film Festival
Anima Mundi
Palm Springs Shortfest
Grosse Klappe Award, Duisburg
Prize CINANIMA 2018 – City of Espinho Award

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