SND Films
By Koert Davidse
2012
documentary
12 min.
Netherlands
Dutch
Produced by Serious Film
HD

Ferry Bertholet has a fascination for the Far East, and especially China. Over the past 30 years he has specialized in collecting Chinese erotic art, which is no longer to be found in China itself, where it has been banned and destroyed.
As a result, Bertholet now owns a big part of this cultural heritage. His collection is one of the largest in the world. It has also dominated his life: day and night, all he thinks about is his collection.

At odds with this is the realization – which has steadily grown over the years – that his collection is basically just things. This why he is now contemplating the idea of selling everything. He has already made contact with potential buyers in China. If all goes well, this cultural heritage will return to its country of origin.

Will he later regret having sold everything or will it be a relief?

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SND Films
By Koert Davidse
2014
documentary
29 min.
Netherlands
Various languages
Produced by Serious Film
HD

Little did Mark Janse know that what had started as a spinoff from his doctoral thesis would, more than a decade later, lead him to discover a Greek-related language that most of his fellow linguists had for decades written off as extinct.

In 2005, a couple of years after he first presented his research, Janse in 2005 received an astonishing email from a colleague at the University of Patra. Attached was a recent recording of a man saying: ‘Pateram doeka fesa epci’ (My father had 12 children). Immediately recognizing that these four words were Cappadocian, Janse found himself in tears. ’The next day, I booked a flight to Greece, and with my colleague I travelled to the village of Mandra. We really thought we were going to find the last speaker of Cappadocian.’

To their surprise they discovered that the whole village spoke Cappadocian.

In 2006 Janse spoke at an annual reunion, in Greek and a little in Cappadocian. ‘There were 5000 people there. Whenever I started saying something in Cappadocian, there was great applause. At the end, many old people were in tears, hugging and kissing me afterwards.’

He says that the sight of a foreign professor telling them that they ought to be proud of their language and culture moved them deeply, as for years Greek society had made them feel ashamed of their language because of its marked Turkish influence.

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